New York's Hottest Hotels

Best for: budget

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The Ace

Terminally trendy, the Ace tends to be a great option in any city lucky enough to have one. Just north of the Flat Iron district, and a short walk from the High Line, interiors are industrial and there’s a creative buzz with young people (with macs on laps) permanently installed in the lobby. Star chef April Bloomfield (of Spotted Pig fame) is behind in-house restaurant Breslin which pulls a fun crowd too. Rooms from around £97, acehotel.com/newyork 

Best for: art enthusiasts 

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Life Hotel 

Once the headquarters of iconic LIFE magazine find this new boutique hotel in the NoMad district. In 1883 founder and editor John Ames Mitchell moved his entire team of artists and writers into apartments on the top floors of the then-office building. Downstairs there was an enormous library and massive writing rooms as well as an underground speakeasy. Today, original panelling remains in the basement bar and a new collection of art from the city’s emerging talent adorns the walls. Rooms from about £110, lifehotel.com

Best for: Brooklyn

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Wythe Hotel

Set in a converted warehouse on the Williamsburg Brooklyn waterfront the views of Manhattan (through dream-big windows) are hard to beat. Farm-to-table restaurant Reynards dishes up sourdough pancakes and bowls of turmeric and ginger bone broth for brunch, and the 6th-floor drinking terrace serves a mean Negroni. It’s down the road from Brooklyn’s best galleries, boutiques and bars, and just one metro stop from Manhattan. Rooms from about £175, wythehotel.com

Best for: being seen 

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Public

Everyone’s talking about this new Lower Eastside opening from Ian Schrager, co-founder of Studio 54, and the man behind the Edition hotels. But if you can’t afford the price tag, head here for drinks - the nightclub, Mailroom, is hands-down the coolest place to be seen in the city (despite its Wall Street spot). Rooms from £350, publichotels.com

Words by Tabitha Joyce. The Iris Letter December 2017.